Hold on.

Funny Parodies and Parody Examples of Great Works of Art

These funny parodies and parody examples are the next relm of Postmodern art.

It might be easier to borrow a 100,000,000 dollar work of art that one might think. Everyone borrows things from their brothers and sisters. Borrowing money from the bank is as easy as having a decent credit score. And borrowing a cup of sugar from the neighbors is an age-old common practice. But how does somebody borrow priceless works of art to make the best parodies? Furthermore, how does one superimpose a famous celebrity into a 15th-century painting to make a funny spoof? Well, this is it! This is actually the very simple definition of funny parodies. These parody examples are two things: borrowed and manipulated. Parodies, rooted in Postmodernism, have been made before but are somehow manipulated.

A Few Parody Examples

The cookie cutter actually has its roots in the Postmodern movement, or rather the parody does. The parody and the reproduction and manipulation of things already done is part of Postmodernism. Repetition, recreation, and even battles of ownership are Postmodern. These parody examples are actually better than a cookie cutter. Funny parodies create copies of something, but the best parodies take images, copy, and then manipulate them. Christmas cookies may all be pristine copies of your favorite Santa and tree shapes, but don’t allude to famous works of art. This idea of reproduction comes from Postmodernism, but one could say that funny parodies are more advanced forms of visual copies. A funny spoof is rooted in delicious postmodern times but has evolved to manipulate images that have already been done.

Take a look at some of these parody examples drawn from famous works of art and think about the many postmodern themes that flow through them.

Regionalism Parodies

How is it possible to be original in a Postmodern world saturated in images? Many millions of funny parodies are shared on Instagram daily and there are more than 40 billion parody examples posted on Instagram today. Many of them on Instagram, Reddit, and Facebook are copies of American Gothic (1930) by Grant Wood (b. 1891). From Leonardo DaVinci and Michelangelo to Andy Warhol; these artists realized that the best parodies and images have already been made. It is impossible to create an image at this point that hasn’t been painted or photographed already. Even Picasso, when seeing the cave paintings, exclaimed that images have not evolved or changed. Salads and kitten pictures consume people. Everything in a Postmodern world is a funny spoof. The billions of pictures of entrees and people’s pets on Instagrams are all just copies of the first food and kitten picture ever taken. Imagine being the revolutionary pet Instagrammer! But there is something revolutionary rooted in the Postmodern notion of the copy: the manipulated copy also known as a parody.

Funny Parodies in Japanese Art

How does one know that a surfer riding a wave is actually riding a parody of the Great Wave of Kanagawa (1829–1832)? Some parody examples like the Postmodern copy of the Great Wave of Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai (b. 1760) are copies, imitations, remakes, and, most importantly, the best parodies. Funny parodies want to be famous. A funny spoof of a famous painting is imitating it. The work is appropriating traits from a famous work of art and trying to be it. It is trying to be famous as well… and admittedly funny parodies usually do become famous. Funny parodies want to be stars walking the red carpet and more! The parody is not an original; it is a remake. As an image, an idea, and sometimes just a theme is copied it transforms into something greater. As something is remade it can easily be changed. Without this imitation, though, and this remaking of a well-known work of art, one cannot decipher what the original may have looked like or why it is relevant. In postmodern time, these copies become more like parodies that have evolved from imitation.

A Religious Funny Spoof!

Godzillas have made their cameos in historic works of art and it is these juxtapositions that are the definition of postmodern funny parodies. These parody examples are combinations of the new and the old. Contemporary art is stitched together like a modern quilt. Images of the new are sewn together with the old. This evolution is manipulation. Funny parodies are born from manipulation. The best parodies become the best only when they are manipulated from original done-before images. A new-born funny spoof is a copy but it is changed somehow. One can see while Darth Vador eats his last supper that old works of art and images can be manipulated into Postmodern art. This Postmodern practice is a practice of taking something that has been done many times before and recreating it into a parody.

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Written by

Topher is the founder and editor of Culture Hog Magazine. He studies art history and works at the Oakland Museum of California. Topher values strong community and worldwide healing and progress via the arts.

https://culturehog.com

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